fbpx

Mortality is 35% Higher for COVID-19 Hospitalized Patients Compared to Influenza Inpatients


Although there was an approximately a 35% higher risk of death in the COVID-19 cohort—even after accounting for other variables—the authors point out that this gap is closing.

In a new study published in JAMA, patients hospitalized with COVID-19 had a much higher mortality rate than those hospitalized with influenza in the fall-winter 2023-2024.

“Patients hospitalized for COVID-19 had a higher risk of death compared with those hospitalized for seasonal influenza (adjusted death rate, 5.70% vs 4.24% at 30 days; adjusted HR, 1.35 [95% CI, 1.10-1.66]),” the investigators wrote.

Although this equates to approximately a 35% higher risk of death in the COVID-19 cohort—even after accounting for other variables—the authors point out that this gap is closing. They explain that during the seasonal virus season the year before (2022-2023), there was a 60% higher risk of death for hospitalized COVID-19 patients vs hospitalized influenza patients.

What You Need to Know

The study reveals that patients hospitalized with COVID-19 during the fall-winter 2023-2024 season had a significantly higher mortality rate compared to those hospitalized with seasonal influenza.

Despite the higher mortality rate for COVID-19 patients, the study highlights a positive trend—the gap in mortality rates between COVID-19 and influenza patients is narrowing.

The study utilized data from the US Department of Veterans Affairs electronic health databases and examined patients admitted to the hospital with COVID-19 or seasonal influenza between October 1, 2023, and March 27, 2024.

This is a significant drop in mortality, and the investigators point out there were no drastic differences associated with different variants. “There was no statistically significant difference in the risk of death among people hospitalized for COVID-19 before and during the JN1-predominant era (adjusted death rate, 5.46% vs 5.82% at 30 days; adjusted HR, 1.07 [95% CI, 0.89-1.28]).”

Study Parameters
The investigators utilized the US Department of Veterans Affairs electronic health databases from all 50 states.

The investigators examined patients who were admitted to the hospital with either a diagnosis of COVID-19 or seasonal influenza between October 1, 2023 – March 27, 2024. And within 2 days before and 10 days after a positive test result for SARS-CoV-2 or influenza.

They note that limitations for the study include predominantly older patients who were male were included in the study, which does not a wider represention of the general population. Additionally, causes of death were not examined.

Clinical Implications
The investigators point out there are some variables including vaccine uptake and antiviral prescribing that can influence mortality and that the rates of hospitalization is nearly twice as much for COVID-19 patients compared to influenza patients in the most recent virus season.

Reference
Xie Y, Choi T, Al-Aly Z. Mortality in Patients Hospitalized for COVID-19 vs Influenza in Fall-Winter 2023-2024. JAMA. Published online May 15, 2024. doi:10.1001/jama.2024.7395



Source link

Daily Dose of Insights

Get a daily infusion of knowledge with our latest blog updates.

We don’t spam! Read our privacy policy for more info.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Related articles

HCV, Breast Cancer Screening Integration Aids Diagnosis, Linkage to Care

Magdalena Meszaros, MDImage Credits: ResearchGateThis article was originally posted on our sister site, HCPLive.Findings from a recent...

New Definition of Long COVID Sets Course for Unified Care and Research

Long COVID as an infection-associated chronic condition persisting for at least 3 months after COVID-19 infection.Image credits:...

Ground Beef and Broccoli | The Recipe Critic

This website may contain affiliate links and advertising so that we can provide recipes to you. Read...

Children with RSV Post-COVID-19 Pandemic Needed More Support

JAMA Pediatrics: Children with RSV post-pandemic needed more support.Image credits: UnsplashIn the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic,...