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Rose Body Scrub Recipe


Many years ago I realized how easy (and inexpensive!) sugar scrubs were to make. Since then I’ve played around with many different versions of exfoliating body scrub. This rose body scrub smells heavenly and leaves skin feeling smooth and refreshed.

Sugar Scrubs

It’s not hard to find body polish with a rose scent, but the ingredients aren’t always the best. Much of the rose scent comes from synthetic chemical fragrances, not real roses. Making your own is really simple and you can customize the exact ingredients.

I’ve also included the option to use rose petal infused oil here. This way you get the benefits and added scent of the roses. If you prefer to skip this step though then just use regular carrier oil.

Here are the ingredients I used in this sugar scrub and what they do:

Rose Body Scrub Ingredients

  • Sugar – While I don’t recommend eating it, sugar makes a great exfoliant for dead skin cells. You could even use pink Himalayan salt instead for more of a pink color if preferred.
  • Carrier oil – This is what helps make the scrub easy to use and is great for moisturizing dry skin. I used sweet almond oil because it has a neutral scent, but fractionated coconut oil would also work. Something like olive oil can feel a little too heavy for certain skin types and overpower the subtle rose scent.
  • Coconut oil – Since coconut oil is solid at room temperature it helps the scrub hold together a little better. It’s also hydrating and nourishing for the skin.
  • Shea butter – Just a touch of shea butter adds a silky smooth feel. It also has vitamin E and vitamin A, and is great for dry skin.
  • Rosehip seed oil – This is the star ingredient in my popular better than botox facial moisturizer. It’s rich in vitamins A, C, and E to nourish skin and promotes skin cell renewal for younger-looking skin.
  • Rose petals – Roses not only smell good, but they’re slightly astringent. This means they help tighten and tone loose skin.
  • Rose kaolin clay – Kaolin clay is good for dry skin and this version gets its pink hue from natural iron oxides. It’s also mildly exfoliating and helps draw out impurities from pores. It also adds a nice pink color to this scrub.
  • Essential oils – These add a pleasant scent and help increase the skin benefits. Real rose essential oil is very expensive, upwards of $150 a bottle. A more affordable option is to use rose absolute. It still comes from real roses, but it’s distilled in a different way that creates more product. You can also opt for geranium, jasmine, lavender, or another floral scent if you don’t want to use rose.

How to Make Rose Powder

If you don’t have ground or powdered rose petals you can easily make some.

  1. Add a few tablespoons of rose petals to a coffee grinder and pulse until they’re a fine powder.
  2. Use a fine mesh sieve to remove the larger pieces.

How to Use a Rose Sugar Scrub

It’s fairly straightforward, but there are a few body scrub tips. I use a tablespoon or more all over for smooth skin. You can also use the sugar scrub on your face for gentle exfoliation as long as you don’t scrub too hard. Apply the scrub in circular motions.

This scrub will last for several months since it doesn’t have water in it, as long as it’s stored properly. Be sure to keep it away from direct light which can cause the oils to oxidize and go rancid faster. Adding some vitamin E oil helps slow down the oil oxidation.

It’s also important to only scoop the scrub out with dry hands since water introduces bacteria.

Since the scrub sloughs off dead skin cells, you can skip the body wash or cleanser before using. I like to follow it up with a light layer of body lotion if my skin is feeling extra dry. You can also use rose water afterward if using this on the face!

Rose Body Scrub Recipe

This yummy smelling scrub feels luxurious on the skin! Gently exfoliate dead skin cells while moisturizing and nourishing.

Prep Time5 minutes

Active Time3 minutes

Oil infusion time1 hour

Total Time1 hour 8 minutes

Yield: 12 ounces

Author: Katie Wells

Rose Infused Oil

  • If you want to use rose-infused oil, then add the sweet almond oil, coconut oil, and whole rose petals to the top of a double boiler.

  • Heat over medium-low heat for about 1 hour, or until the oil smells like roses. Add more water to the bottom of the double boiler as necessary to prevent burning. You want the oil to gently heat, not simmer!

  • Use a cheesecloth or fine mesh strainer to remove the rose petals and compost them. Reserve the infused oil for your body scrub.

Rose Body Scrub

  • Once the oil has cooled to room temperature, combine all of the ingredients together in a mixing bowl and stir to combine. I used a silicone spatula to mash in the shea butter, but you could also warm the shea butter and coconut oil together to make them easier to combine.

  • Use generously on the skin to exfoliate during a shower.

This scrub will last for several months at room temperature if stored away from light and moisture. Be sure to use clean, dry hands when scooping some out.

More Scrub Recipes

Looking for some more scrubs to add to your skincare routine or give as gifts? Try a few of these!

What are your favorite scents for sugar scrubs? Leave a comment and let us know!



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